Bigger on the Inside

Feb. 3, Feast of St. Blaise, a doctor who lived in a cave and who healed men and animals.  Injured animals would approach him on their own for his help but never disturbed him at prayer.  While imprisoned during the prosecution of Christians, he saved a child choking on a fish bone, which is how the blessing of throats on his feast day came about.  He is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers and is patron against wild beasts, whooping cough, goiter, and throat diseases; and of animals, builders, carvers, construction workers, healthy throats, stone-cutters, veterinarians, wool-combers, and wool weavers.




Somehow I'm not surprised Chesterton penned the first "It's bigger on the inside!"  (You know what I'm talking about, Whovians!)

This quote is a follow-up and an embellishment on the first one.  Chesterton affirms the Church's teaching that the family is the most important societal institution--more important than any other, though it works on the smallest scale--in the privacy of one's own house, rarely seen or paid attention by the great political players.

As with the "everything to someone" quote, Chesterton balks at the so-called intellectuals who deem the work of nurses and mothers as somehow trivial and mundane, when they themselves put so much time and energy into the goings-on of the nursery.  It's absurd to find the formation of a human being of the utmost importance but ignore the grave importance of the ones doing the forming.  Yet that is what they do.  It's a common problem, even today, when we see that teachers and childcare providers are paid so little, treated so poorly by employers and parents.  Why should they be any less valued than doctors, businessmen, and senators?  All of those people, after all, were taught and mothered by someone.

This quote also offers an insight into the nature of God.  For, like everything He has made, it reflects the One who has made it.  The God-who-became-Man, entering the world quietly and unobtrusively, the same world He brought into being from nothing, still works quietly, privately; not in the public forum, trumpeting vast truths like the popes; or working staggering, undeniable miracles, like the saints.  No, he works in the quiet of the human heart; wooing wills, loving the lonely, doing the mighty work of redemption, which goes by, day by day, as profound and unnoticed as a flower turning a petal.

He takes a simple circle of bread and empties it, only to fill it with Himself; that tiny white Host, which is quite bigger on the inside; in fact, larger than the world itself.


Weekends with Chesterton link-up hosted at Amongst Lovely Things.
sig

7 comments:

  1. Wow, what a thought provoking post. I love how Chesterton elevated the common ordinary things and the great value if women and family. You've given me some new food for thought with your commentary on how that common ordinary quiet work reflects the image of God.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is a royal compliment, thank you Sarah!

      Delete
  2. Love love love Christie! This is one of my personal favourite quotes by Chesterton and how he speaks so impact fully about something that people just brush off and ignore.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. <3 One of my favorites now, too. Although, I say that about every quote of his I read. :P

      Delete
  3. This is one of my favorites from Chesterton! Beautiful photo and love your insight. So glad I found your site! It's so warm and beautiful! Hoping to join your photography adventure as I'm trying to learn how to capture the beautiful paradox I live in.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paradox is right! Isn't it wonderful and exciting? And sometimes frustrating? But never boring.

      Let's experiment together. I really need a photography group to bounce ideas, advice, and experimentation off of, as I am just fumbling to figure it out on my own.

      Delete
    2. Okay, I could re-read your last two paragraphs again and again. Beautiful. Just beautiful! I would love to figure something out with you! A photography group would be great. Accountability and a way to learn are what I am in need of for sure as I am definitely a fumbling photographer. I looked for an email for you but couldn't find one...

      Delete

Leave me a comment! Don't be shy!